Tag: Rev. Tanya Wallace

When should we pray with our feet?

The Rev. Dave Woessner, St. Michael’s-on-the-Heights, Worcester at center of June 1, 2020 peaceful action. Photo: [T&G Staff/Rick Cinclair]

In 1859 The General Convention of the Episcopal Church met in Richmond, Virginia and said nothing about slavery. Now we have another pivotal moment in the work of anti-racism in our country. We cannot sit this one out. There are many ways to engage this work and our Beloved Community ministry has offered us resources. One way to take part in this moment is through public witness.

I have participated in a number of public witnesses through the years. In the early 1980’s I marched with Pax Christi in opposition to the nuclear arms race. I was arrested twice (but not detained) with Daniel and Philip Berrigan and Elizabeth McAllister for planned and peaceful symbolic actions.

As a bishop I have marched in public prayer processions with other bishops in Washington, D.C., Chicago, Salt Lake City, Alaska and Austin, Texas to bring attention to the public health crisis of gun violence. And have led public prayer witnesses at Smith and Wesson headquarters in Springfield. Caring for God’s creation led me to take part in public witness in Minneapolis and several towns within our own diocese.

How do we, as people of faith, discern when to take part in public witness? I find these questions helpful in my own life and ministry. 

  • Does the event align with the values of the Gospel?
  • Is it meaningful and timely?
  • Is it intended and likely to be non-violent?
  • What do I know about the planners/leaders of this witness?
  • Will this public witness bear witness to the Risen Christ and to the presence and power of a loving God?
The Rev. Tanya R. Wallace, rector of All Saints’, South Hadley (right) with Lutheran Pastor Anna Tew. Photo: submitted

Ours is a unique moment in history and a time for each one of us to consider how to lend our voices to the work of justice. I have been deeply moved by peaceful protestors who willingly risked exposure to the virus to stand up and stand together for the dignity of black lives. There is always a risk when we put our values out there on a sign for all to see. In these days deciding to be part of a public witness can have real consequences, so please wear a mask. How deeply we are feeling the grief of our biases, our blindness and our white privilege.

Screenshot of video of The Rev. Meredyth Ward, Urban Missioner, at June 1 protest and before the #sayhername rally on June 7. Both events were in the City of Worcester.

We pray for justice. We work for justice. And, sometimes, we walk for justice. May God be with all who pray with their feet in these days and may God’s justice roll.

+Doug